Aviation Day Flashback: Concorde

Concorde G-BOAB in storage at London Heathrow ...

Concorde G-BOAB in storage at London Heathrow Airport. This aircraft flew for 22,296 hours between its first flight in 1976 and its final flight in 2000. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

19th August means Aviation day, and although it is more of a US based tradition, Aviation Geeks should know no boundaries.

So, in the spirit of celebrating Orville Wright’s birthday and uniting with fellow geeks all around the world, I have given a break to “GlobeTrotters on Twitter” for couple of days.

I would like to share with you one of my life’s greatest regrets, of not flying on The World’s most technically advanced aircraft ever built, The Icon of Aviation and The Marvel of Engineering, Concorde. Unfortunately, it seems I would never be able to fly on the supersonic airliner in the distant future too.

As someone rightly pointed out to me few days back, “with the retirement of Concorde, the aviation industry took a step back for the first time in it’s history”.

I couldn’t agree more.

In fact, during a recent conversation with Brett Snyder, he also revealed that his most memorable flight was on a British Airways Concorde, from London Heathrow LHR to New York JFK.

So, if you have 30 minutes today, spend them well and watch this video on “The Story of Final Concorde”.

In fact, if you’re an enthusiast, I can positively recommend you to subscribe to “The Concorde Channel” on YouTube for some excellent content on the great aircraft.

Have a great day folks, and keep flying.

Note: As I now realize, the gentleman I refer to above is none other than Mr Bangalore Aviation himself, Devesh Agarwal. His piece on the Concorde, although written few years back, is still is an emotional read.

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5 comments

  1. Pingback: GlobeTrotters on Twitter – Devesh Agarwal (Bangalore Aviation) | Vishal Mehra and Co.
  2. Pingback: GlobeTrotters on Twitter | Devesh Agarwal (Bangalore Aviation) | Vishal Mehra and Co.
  3. Pingback: The History of Concorde | Historical Writings

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